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Clinical and Research Resources for the OSU TBI-ID


OSU TBI-ID Short Version

OSU TBI-ID short version can be used for clinical, research or programmatic purposes. It is the briefest version that still provides several Summary Indices on which the original version was validated. To shorten the instrument, TBIs resulting in loss of consciousness are emphasized over less severe injuries. Symptoms, either at the time of injury or persisting to current day, are not elicited.  The short version can typically be administered in 5 minutes and is the form recommended by the NIH Common Date Elements and the PhenX Toolkit. There is another version of the short version that is used when interviewing after a recent, documented TBI—which is the version used by the TBI Model Systems National Database.

The short version can be used free of charge and without further permission from the authors as long as no changes are made to the provided version. Please contact the authors if changes may be required by your application. Please note that like all versions of the OSU TBI-ID, copyright protections apply.

link to OSU TBI-ID Short Form and Training Module

OSU TBI-ID Clinical Version

OSU TBI-ID clinical version has been made available through the BrainLine website for several years. This version uses the acronym “T-B-I” to remind clinicians about the basic tenets of identifying TBIs. The clinical version includes questions that can be incorporated into a clinical assessment or other interview to determine a client’s lifetime exposure to TBI. The supporting materials include guidance about how to interpret information elicited as well as suggestions for how to accommodate consequences of TBI in practice.

OSU TBI-ID Research Version

OSU TBI-ID research version is the longest version of the instrument and was the basis of the original validation articles and is being used in several of the federally funded research projects. It provides the most Summary Indices, but can typically require 20 minutes to administer. Contact us for a copy of the research version and instruction on how to administer it. Gale Whiteneck and colleagues adapted the approach used for the OSU TBI-ID for a Computer Assisted Telephone Interview (CATI) which they indicate can be administered typically in a few minutes and provides all the Summary Indices of the research version. 

This website has been funded with financial assistance from Grant #H133A120086 awarded by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) to the Ohio Valley Center for Brain Injury Prevention and Rehabilitation for the current funding period of 10/01/2012 - 09/30/2017.